Host City - Barcelona


A walk through the history of Barcelona

 

The first human settlements in Barcelona date back to Neolithic times. The city itself was founded by the Romans who set up a colony called Barcino at the end of the 1st century BC. The colony had some thousand inhabitants and was bounded by a defensive wall, the remains of which can still be seen in the old town.


For over 200 years, Barcelona was under Muslim rule, and, following the Christian reconquest, it became a county of the Carolingian Empire and one of the main residences of the court of the Crown of Aragon. The fruitful medieval period establishedBarcelona's position as the economic and political centre of the Western Mediterranean. The city's Gothic Quarter bears witness to the splendour enjoyed by the city from the 13th to the 15th centuries.

 

From the 15th to 18th centuries Barcelona entered a period of decline, while it struggled to maintain its economic and political independence. This struggle ended in 1714, when the city fell to the Bourbon troops and Catalonia's and Catalans' rights and privilegeswere suppressed. 


A period of cultural recovery began in the mid-19th century with the arrival of the development of the textile industry. During this period, which was known as the Renaixença, Catalan regained prominence as a literary language.

 

The 20th century ushered in widespread urban renewal throughout Barcelona city, culminating in its landmark Eixample district, which showcases some of Barcelona's most distinctive Catalan art-nouveau, or modernista, buildings. The Catalan Antoni Gaudí, one of the most eminent architects, designed buildings such as the Casa Milà(known as La Pedrera, the Catalan for stone quarry), the Casa Batlló and the Sagrada Família church, which have become world-famous landmarks.


The freedoms achieved during this period were severely restricted during the Civil Warin 1936 and the subsequent dictatorship. With the reinstatement of democracy in 1978,Barcelona society regained its economic strength and the Catalan language was restored. The city's hosting of the 1992 Olympic Games gave fresh impetus to Barcelona's potential and reaffirmed its status as a major metropolis.


In 2004, the Forum of Cultures reclaimed industrial zones to convert them into residential districts. An example of the renewed vigour with which Barcelona is looking towards the 21st century
 

Customs

In Barcelona, and throughout Catalonia, there are two official languages: Catalan, the language of the Catalans, and Spanish, the official language of Spain. As in most European countries and also in Catalonia, GMT is the time system used in Barcelona. Clocks are one hour ahead of GMT in winter and two in summer and are adjusted twice a year, going forward one hour in winter and back an hour in summer.


Spain is in the Eurozone and the euro is its official currency. Foreign currency can be exchanged at savings banks, or ‘Caixes' (the opening hours are Monday to Friday, 8.30am to 2pm. Thursday afternoons, 4.30pm to 7.45pm, except June to September) and banks (Monday to Friday, 8.30am to 2pm and Saturday, 8.30am to 1pm, except summer). Bureaux de change also open every day in Barcelona city centre, and at the main railway stations and the Estació del Nord bus station and at the Airport, where they have longer opening hours.

 

The working day in Barcelona usually begins at 8 or 9 in the morning and ends around 6 or 7 in the evening, with a one- or two-hour break for lunch at 2pm. This is the daily life and routine that befits the Catalans' reputation in the rest of Spain as a hard-working and thrifty people.


Lunch and dinner are usually eaten a little later than in the rest of Europe. Most restaurants open from 1pm to 4pm, and from 8pm until 11pm. Tipping isn't obligatory, but people usually leave 5% if they are satisfied with the service.


Shops have long opening hours, from 10am to 2pm and from 4.30 to 8 or 8.30pm. In Barcelona city centre, most shops don't close at lunchtime and large shopping centres and department stores open until 10pm in summer.

 

With regard to prices, Barcelona features a wide range of accommodation, shops and services to suit all pockets. Here are some approximate prices in Barcelona: a single public transport ticket costs 2.15€, an espresso coffee between 1 and 1.50€; a lunchtime set menu can cost between 8 and 15€, a cinema ticket 10€; a sandwich 3 to 4€, and a newspaper about 1.30€. Smoking is prohibited in all bars and restaurants in Barcelona. 

Addresses of interest

Accessible Barcelona  

Barcelona is working to achieve accessibility for disabled people with one main objective: to create a cohesive city which will favour quality of life and respect for diversity. Between us all, we build a better Barcelona, in search of freedom, autonomy and facilities so that the most characteristic places and public transport are accessible and the city can be enjoyed by disabled people. 

More information 

 

Studying in Barcelona 

Barcelona is one of the most popular university destinations chosen by students throughout the world due to its academic excellence, location and vision of the future. Barcelona has been a university city for over 500 years, and its eight universities (four of them public, three private and one distance-learning) offer six fields of study in their faculties: technology, science, health sciences, social sciences, sport management and humanities. 

Barcelona Centre Universitari (BCU).

The centre offers step-by-step information for anyone wishing to study at Barcelona's universities.

Main office: Torrent de l'Olla, 219 (08012 Barcelona) | Tel. 932 389 049  www.bcu.cesca.es |info@bcu.cat

 

Medical tourism 

Catalan medicine enjoys an excellent reputation worldwide and has been a pioneer in several scientific fields. Barcelona offers the best and most complete range of private medicine and healthcare facilities in southern Europe. Not only is the city at the cutting edge of private healthcare, it also offers a high-quality national health system making Barcelona an excellent and prestigious medical tourism destination. 

In addition to its state-of-the-art medicine and healthcare facilities, BCM also offers a series of additional services providing integrated solutions to travel and accommodation in Barcelona, both for patients and their companions: travel arrangements, booking accommodation in Barcelona, translation service, designated medical assistant, transport in Barcelona, insurance, information about leisure and tourism in Barcelona. 

Barcelona Medical Agency (BMA).

Passeig de Gràcia, 48 (08007) Barcelona. | 931 998 690

www.barcelonamedicalagency.com |info@barcelonamedicalagency.com

 

City of artists 

Barcelona is a city of art which supports the arts. The Barcelona Turisme Creatiu (Barcelona Creative Tourism) platform, which has been set up to help develop art and culture exhibitions and projects in the city by artists from around the world, is a result of the artistic concerns that have always characterised the city. 

This joint initiative of the Municipal Council and Turisme de Barcelona, aims to hold and promoteartistic and cultural exhibitions and expressions from artists all over the world who have chosen Barcelona to carry them out, meaning that all the main players on the cultural scene play a key role. 

The website Barcelona Creativa is an important tool where you will find information about the great scope, exhibition and potential for interactivity offered by the platform from Barcelona.

Useful telephone numbers

 

The main telephone numbers for any eventuality or emergency. Help is just a phone call away.

 

More information 

 

Consulats

 

More information 

 

CPTC

More information 


Note:  Information from: http://www.barcelonaturisme.com

Conference Venue
ConferenceVenue
The University of Barcelona (Universidad de Barcelona) is a public university located in the city of Barcelona, Catalonia in Spain.